Tag: Journal Of Venomous Animals And Toxins Including Tropical Diseases

The effects of the presence or absence of crotamine in rattlesnake venom

This study revealed that there is a pattern in the distribution of a small protein, named crotamine, in rattlesnake venoms. Moreover, the presence or absence of this protein can alter the venom composition and, consequently, the envenoming effects, which could affect the antivenom efficacy Read More →

Antifungal action of liriodenine in systemic mycoses

The discovery and development of new compounds with antifungal action are essential to fight the emergence of resistant microorganisms. Liriodenine, a molecule extracted from plants, has shown to act against several strains of fungi that cause systemic mycoses. Read More →

Snake venom toxin activates immune cells and decreases the invasion potential of tumor cells

BJcuL toxin – isolated from the venom of the Brazilian snake Bothrops jararacussu – was able to stimulate cells of the immune system to act against tumor cells. Blood neutrophils, when stimulated by BJcuL, reduced the migratory potential of neuroblastoma cells in culture. Read More →

Treatment of difficult-to-heal venous ulcers with fibrin sealant

Difficult-to-heal ulcers in lower limbs are those that occur below the knee and for several reasons do not reach healing, remaining open for months or years. Difficulties in healing encourage the development of new products. Fibrin sealant is one of these alternatives because it is a biological dressing with excellent healing properties. Read More →

Bufotenine and new perspectives for the treatment of rabies

Currently, rabies remains almost 100% fatal due to the lack of specific treatment. Bufotenine – an alkaloid present in some frogs’ skin secretions as well as in plant seeds – has been shown to be effective in reducing either the onset of symptoms or the mortality in mice. Read More →

How can the use of a biological glue allow motor recovery after spinal cord injury?

Upper and lower limb injuries are common outcomes of accidents. There is no significant recovery and surgical options are quite limited. A research has developed a new therapy by using the fibrina sealant produced by the Center for the Study of Venoms and Venomous Animals (CEVAP) conjugated with the drug dimethyl fumarate. The results are encouraging regarding mobility recovery. Read More →